Sunday, August 12, 2018

That's One Way to Change a Point of View, I Suppose

Stick some boobs in the view:

Via Althouse: Yeah, that's called viewpoint neutrality.
"Facebook censors artist's work criticising male-dominated society because it features naked breasts" (The Art Newspaper)(photograph with naked breasts at the link).
The Icelandic artist Borghildur Indridadóttir is blaming Facebook for having taken over her account after she had posted pictures featuring bare female breasts. "Facebook told me the pictures were against their community standards and did not only take those away from my timeline, but also deleted my friends and likes," she says.
The pictures were part of her work Demoncrazy, which deals with how older men continue to dominate certain public and social spaces in Iceland. As part of the Reykjavik arts festival in June, Indridadóttir showed photographs of topless young women standing in front of painted portraits of older men...
I'm certainly not going to stare at pictures of old politicians when there are bare breasted young women attempting to get my attention. Heck, I'd be unwilling to look at the pictures of old politicians even if the bare breasted young ladies weren't there.

More Demoncrazy — watch out for breasts — here.

Facebook should have a viewpoint neutral standard, not a ban with an exception for the right political ideas. And if posing your naked model in front of a picture of an old man was enough to get special treatment, then anyone could set up their photoshoot like that.
It might be the translation for Viking, but I wonder if this is a manifestation of the "Free the Nipple" campaign, because as far as I know, Facebook does not forbid photos of topless males (and who really knows if they are males, or transgender women?).

Facebook also allows the portrayal of the female breast in art. From the second link:
In 2015, Facebook changed its policy on nudity and its standards page now says: “We also allow photographs of paintings, sculptures, and other art that depicts nude figures.”
One could argue that this is performance art. 

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